Eliminate Disriminatory School Admissions Screens

Join Teens Take Charge to end this tale of two school systems, we must eliminate all discriminatory admissions screens.

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About the Event

After waiting patiently for two years as Mayor de Blasio and school system leaders ducked, dodged, extended deadlines, and backtracked on the issue of school integration, we knew it was time to take matters into our hands.

We, the students, had had enough.

So, starting in November 2019, we decided to strike.

Again. And again. And again. And again. And again. And again.

Until our demands were met. The pandemic interrupted our public actions, but we have not stopped fighting.

We’ll keep standing up and speaking out until the adults stop acting like children.

Changes To Advocate For

While we shift toward a more equitable enrollment system, we must address the harms of segregation right now. We demand that the NYC DOE immediately take following steps, starting in the approximately 100 small, segregated high schools where less than one in four students enters reading and doing math at grade level.

Paid internships for all students

Guarantee all high school students quality, paid internship opportunities in the summer and during the school year. Hire a full-time work-based learning coordinator at every school whose duty will be to 1) match students with positions that align to their interests in school and 2) to support them in developing soft and hard skills that will set them up for success in those roles and beyond.

More Guidance & College Counselors

Guidance counselors in NYC schools are often overworked. Some have a caseload of 400 students or more and must juggle students’ emotional needs with helping seniors apply to and understand the intricacies of the college system. Every high school should have a full-time college-and-career counselor, and the ratio for counselors to students should be 1:80 or lower.

Shared Sports, Clubs & Courses

Create consortiums or nearby or co-located high schools and allow students to participate in sports, clubs, and advanced courses at any school in their radius if their school does not offer that class or activity. A school’s size should not limit a student’s ability to pursue their academic and extracurricular passions.

History Of Screens

In 1986, NYC’s board of education banned “unfair screening devices” such as interviews an entrance exams. They found that screened programs were unfair and discriminatory. However, this changed during Mayor Bloomberg’s tenure. The number of screened schools more than doubled, and the ban was lifted on those discriminatory screening devices. Since taking office in 2014, Mayor de Blasio has allowed dozens of schools to continue using discriminatory screens.

Teens Take Charge

TEENS TAKE CHARGE IS A STUDENT-LED MOVEMENT FOR EDUCATIONAL EQUITY IN NEW YORK CITY.

Too often, decisions about our schools are made without our voices.

No longer. Our growing coalition of high school students from across the five boroughs will not rest until our public school system lives up to its promise of providing all of us an equitable education.

Through oral and written testimony, direct-action organizing campaigns, and relentless advocacy, we — the students of New York City — are taking our schools and futures into our hands.

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Eliminate Disriminatory School Admissions Screens

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Job Description

After waiting patiently for two years as Mayor de Blasio and school system leaders ducked, dodged, extended deadlines, and backtracked on the issue of school integration, we knew it was time to take matters into our hands.

We, the students, had had enough.

So, starting in November 2019, we decided to strike.

Again. And again. And again. And again. And again. And again.

Until our demands were met. The pandemic interrupted our public actions, but we have not stopped fighting.

We’ll keep standing up and speaking out until the adults stop acting like children.

Changes To Advocate For

While we shift toward a more equitable enrollment system, we must address the harms of segregation right now. We demand that the NYC DOE immediately take following steps, starting in the approximately 100 small, segregated high schools where less than one in four students enters reading and doing math at grade level.

Paid internships for all students

Guarantee all high school students quality, paid internship opportunities in the summer and during the school year. Hire a full-time work-based learning coordinator at every school whose duty will be to 1) match students with positions that align to their interests in school and 2) to support them in developing soft and hard skills that will set them up for success in those roles and beyond.

More Guidance & College Counselors

Guidance counselors in NYC schools are often overworked. Some have a caseload of 400 students or more and must juggle students’ emotional needs with helping seniors apply to and understand the intricacies of the college system. Every high school should have a full-time college-and-career counselor, and the ratio for counselors to students should be 1:80 or lower.

Shared Sports, Clubs & Courses

Create consortiums or nearby or co-located high schools and allow students to participate in sports, clubs, and advanced courses at any school in their radius if their school does not offer that class or activity. A school’s size should not limit a student’s ability to pursue their academic and extracurricular passions.

History Of Screens

In 1986, NYC’s board of education banned “unfair screening devices” such as interviews an entrance exams. They found that screened programs were unfair and discriminatory. However, this changed during Mayor Bloomberg’s tenure. The number of screened schools more than doubled, and the ban was lifted on those discriminatory screening devices. Since taking office in 2014, Mayor de Blasio has allowed dozens of schools to continue using discriminatory screens.

Teens Take Charge

TEENS TAKE CHARGE IS A STUDENT-LED MOVEMENT FOR EDUCATIONAL EQUITY IN NEW YORK CITY.

Too often, decisions about our schools are made without our voices.

No longer. Our growing coalition of high school students from across the five boroughs will not rest until our public school system lives up to its promise of providing all of us an equitable education.

Through oral and written testimony, direct-action organizing campaigns, and relentless advocacy, we — the students of New York City — are taking our schools and futures into our hands.

Apply Now
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Eliminate Disriminatory School Admissions Screens

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Scholarship Description

After waiting patiently for two years as Mayor de Blasio and school system leaders ducked, dodged, extended deadlines, and backtracked on the issue of school integration, we knew it was time to take matters into our hands.

We, the students, had had enough.

So, starting in November 2019, we decided to strike.

Again. And again. And again. And again. And again. And again.

Until our demands were met. The pandemic interrupted our public actions, but we have not stopped fighting.

We’ll keep standing up and speaking out until the adults stop acting like children.

Changes To Advocate For

While we shift toward a more equitable enrollment system, we must address the harms of segregation right now. We demand that the NYC DOE immediately take following steps, starting in the approximately 100 small, segregated high schools where less than one in four students enters reading and doing math at grade level.

Paid internships for all students

Guarantee all high school students quality, paid internship opportunities in the summer and during the school year. Hire a full-time work-based learning coordinator at every school whose duty will be to 1) match students with positions that align to their interests in school and 2) to support them in developing soft and hard skills that will set them up for success in those roles and beyond.

More Guidance & College Counselors

Guidance counselors in NYC schools are often overworked. Some have a caseload of 400 students or more and must juggle students’ emotional needs with helping seniors apply to and understand the intricacies of the college system. Every high school should have a full-time college-and-career counselor, and the ratio for counselors to students should be 1:80 or lower.

Shared Sports, Clubs & Courses

Create consortiums or nearby or co-located high schools and allow students to participate in sports, clubs, and advanced courses at any school in their radius if their school does not offer that class or activity. A school’s size should not limit a student’s ability to pursue their academic and extracurricular passions.

History Of Screens

In 1986, NYC’s board of education banned “unfair screening devices” such as interviews an entrance exams. They found that screened programs were unfair and discriminatory. However, this changed during Mayor Bloomberg’s tenure. The number of screened schools more than doubled, and the ban was lifted on those discriminatory screening devices. Since taking office in 2014, Mayor de Blasio has allowed dozens of schools to continue using discriminatory screens.

Teens Take Charge

TEENS TAKE CHARGE IS A STUDENT-LED MOVEMENT FOR EDUCATIONAL EQUITY IN NEW YORK CITY.

Too often, decisions about our schools are made without our voices.

No longer. Our growing coalition of high school students from across the five boroughs will not rest until our public school system lives up to its promise of providing all of us an equitable education.

Through oral and written testimony, direct-action organizing campaigns, and relentless advocacy, we — the students of New York City — are taking our schools and futures into our hands.

Apply Now